Meet volunteers from across the country

Learn what it's like to volunteer with us and the types of projects you could get involved in:

ASC volunteer Ana

“I believe human connections are an integral and invaluable part of what makes us human. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease rubs us from the memories of all the connections we’ve ever made, leaving us in an unpleasant and anxious abyss. Knowing how many people are slipping away into this darkness leaves me feeling helpless and disheartened. And although I would love to make a great contribution, I’m not able to financially support the organization. However, I can and want to dedicate some of my free time to support the Society in any available capacity.

I’m impressed with the positive and supportive manner in which the organization interacts with those afflicted by Alzheimer’s, their guardians and loved ones. I also admire the wholehearted attempts the Society makes in responding to all the requests and concerns voiced by the families and friends of people living with Alzheimer’s."

—Ana
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Canada

 

"As a student and someone interested in the not-for-profit sector, volunteering at the Alzheimer Society allows me to apply the skills and knowledge I have. I'm also given the opportunity to learn about dementia and those impacted by it. And it's exciting to know that I'm with an organization that is filled with dedicated individuals working toward providing incredible outreach and services."

—Dagmawit
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Canada

ASC volunteer Dagmawit
 

Odette Bourgeois

"Like many, I volunteer because of my personal experience with the disease. I volunteer at the Society's Vancouver Resource Centre, preparing materials for different dementia education sessions and doing general office work, and at the Society’s Provincial Office, where I gather statistical data that will help the Society better serve people living with dementia."

—Odette
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of British Columbia

Read more about Odette >

 

"As a retiree, volunteering at the Alzheimer Society gives me a sense of purpose. It’s flexible and there’s a lot of variety in the work. When I walk through the front doors of the Society, I’m never exactly sure what the day will bring. On one day, I may be tasked with amalgamating workshop evaluations, and on another I may find myself creating brain challenging games for the Minds in Motion® program."

—Marilyn
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Manitoba

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Volunteer Marilyn McCorrister
 

Volunteer John Clarke

"My father lived the journey of Alzheimer’s, so after I retired I wanted to give back to the community in a meaningful way that benefitted others dealing with the disease. I help out the Alzheimer Society any way I can, and that includes making deliveries and pick-ups of educational material as well as supporting fund development initiatives."

—John
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

"I have been volunteering with the Alzheimer Society for about 6 years, and I have no plans of stopping anytime soon. Mostly I help around the office, preparing mail outs, folding t-shirts or sorting surveys. But I have also been known to don the Hali Derby duck costume and participate in events around the city. That’s right, I dress like a duck and I like it!"

—Josie
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia

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Volunteer Josie Erlach
 

Volunteer Jaclyn Turpin

"I am a student at King’s University College studying Family Studies and Thanatology (bereavement and grief). Volunteering with the Alzheimer Society allowed me to put my academic knowledge to practice. As a support services volunteer, I helped review the current programming and researched its benefits to clients."

—Jaclyn
Volunteer with the Alzheimer Society of Oxford (Ontario)

 


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National Volunteer Week: Why Louise chooses to volunteer

Last Updated: 04/18/2019