How well do you know the risks of dementia?

Canada
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Think you know about reducing your risk of dementia? In partnership with RBC Wealth Management, Royal Trust, the Alzheimer Society of Canada challenges you to test your knowledge and take our quiz on reducing the risk of dementia!

How well do you know the risks of dementia?

Do you know what you can do to protect your brain and reduce your risk of dementia? Over the past few weeks, we’ve taken a close look at actions you can take and choices you can make to keep your brain healthy and the risk of dementia low, such as:

Now, it’s time to test your knowledge on dementia risk and prevention! Can you get all the questions correct?

1. True or false? There are things I can do to reduce my risk of dementia.
Try again!

Answer: A. True


Yes, there are things you can do right now to reduce your risk of  dementia! While there are factors that increase our risk for dementia that we have no control over, such as age, sex and genetics, researchers estimate that around 40% of dementia diagnoses may be a result of twelve risk factors that we can control.

These factors range from smoking to lack of physical activity to even air pollution, as recent research has discovered. There are brain-healthy tips and strategies you can take right now to manage these risk factors and reduce your risk!

Learn more about the risk factors for dementia that you can control.
Correct!

Answer: A. True

Yes, there are things you can do right now to reduce your risk of  dementia! While there are factors that increase our risk for dementia that we have no control over, such as age, sex and genetics, researchers estimate that around 40% of dementia diagnoses may be a result of twelve risk factors that we can control.

These factors range from smoking to lack of physical activity to even air pollution, as recent research has discovered. There are brain-healthy tips and strategies you can take right now to manage these risk factors and reduce your risk!

Learn more about the risk factors for dementia that you can control.
2. What activity can help me reduce my risk of dementia?
Correct, but there's a better answer!

Answer: E. All of the above.

All four of these actions are great ways to reduce your risk of dementia! Having a good approach to brain health means having a mix of staying socially connected, staying physically active, managing your stress levels and challenging your brain.

Read more about the brain-healthy tips to reduce your risk of dementia.
You got it right!

Answer: E. All of the above.

All four of these actions are great ways to reduce your risk of dementia! Having a good approach to brain health means having a mix of staying socially connected, staying physically active, managing your stress levels and challenging your brain.

Read more about the brain-healthy tips to reduce your risk of dementia.
3. True or false? Hearing loss can increase my risk of dementia.
Sorry, try again!

Answer: A. True


Unfortunately, it’s true. While more research needs to be done to understand exactly the connection between hearing loss and dementia risk, the good news is that it is a risk factor you can minimize if you take care of your hearing! Have annual hearing evaluations and avoid listening to music too loudly. If hearing does become a problem, ensure you’re wearing a hearing aid.

Download our infosheet on risk factors (PDF) for an easy-to-print resource on the risks of dementia, including more tips on how to manage risks like hearing loss.
Correct!

Answer: A. True


Unfortunately, it’s true. While more research needs to be done to understand exactly the connection between hearing loss and dementia risk, the good news is that it is a risk factor you can minimize if you take care of your hearing! Have annual hearing evaluations and avoid listening to music too loudly. If hearing does become a problem, ensure you’re wearing a hearing aid.

Download our infosheet on risk factors (PDF) for an easy-to-print resource on the risks of dementia, including more tips on how to manage risks like hearing loss.
4. What’s the easiest approach I can take to start a new exercise routine?
There's a better answer!

Answer: C. Set reasonable goals to start


While regular physical activity is a great way to reduce the risk of dementia, it’s important that you have fun with it as well! If the activity feels like a chore, takes up a lot of time or it’s too difficult, it may end up discouraging you from keeping at it. Keep the exercise simple and straightforward to start, and that will help you stay consistent and motivated!

However, starting a new activity can also be a good way to challenge your brain —just make sure you don’t push yourself too hard and you know what to expect!

Learn more about brain-healthy tips to be physically active.
That's right!

Answer: C. Set reasonable goals to start


While regular physical activity is a great way to reduce the risk of dementia, it’s important that you have fun with it as well! If the activity feels like a chore, takes up a lot of time or it’s too difficult, it may end up discouraging you from keeping at it. Keep the exercise simple and straightforward to start, and that will help you stay consistent and motivated!

However, starting a new activity can also be a good way to challenge your brain —just make sure you don’t push yourself too hard and you know what to expect!

Learn more about brain-healthy tips to be physically active.
5. True or false? There’s no way to have effective social interaction if I can’t see my friends and family in person.
Sorry, try again!

Answer: B. False


We may be staying home more these days due to the pandemic, but there are still ways to get connected and beat the negative effects of social isolation! Scheduling regular chats on the phone, connecting with someone on Facebook, even sending a letter, are all simple actions you can take, but can make all the difference for both you and the person at the other end of the line!

And if you’re talking with people over online video chats like FaceTime, Skype and Zoom, also try playing some online games together, watching a movie or show or even visiting a virtual escape room!

Check out more tips for staying socially connected through our resources for managing through COVID-19.
That's correct!

Answer: B. False


We may be staying home more these days due to the pandemic, but there are still ways to get connected and beat the negative effects of social isolation! Scheduling regular chats on the phone, connecting with someone on Facebook, even sending a letter, are all simple actions you can take, but can make all the difference for both you and the person at the other end of the line!

And if you’re talking with people over online video chats like FaceTime, Skype and Zoom, also try playing some online games together, watching a movie or show or even visiting a virtual escape room!

Check out more tips for staying socially connected through our resources for managing through COVID-19.
6. What is not an example of an aerobic activity?
Try again!

Answer: A. Sprinting


When it comes to physical activities, the Alzheimer Society recommends aerobic activities like jogging, walking and swimming They increase the heart rate temporarily, and are not meant to be intense, so you can keep doing the activity for a good amount of time. Even a simple activity like walking is a good, brain-healthy aerobic exercise that’s safe and recommended by experts!

While sprinting is also good exercise, it requires a lot of energy over a short amount of time. If not done properly or for too long, it may cause more stress on your body than an aerobic exercise, and in the worst cases lead to falls that can cause a traumatic brain injury – a risk factor that can lead to dementia.

Learn more about traumatic brain injuries and their risks to cognitive function.
You got it!

Answer: A. Sprinting

When it comes to physical activities, the Alzheimer Society recommends aerobic activities like jogging, walking and swimming They increase the heart rate temporarily, and are not meant to be intense, so you can keep doing the activity for a good amount of time. Even a simple activity like walking is a good, brain-healthy aerobic exercise that’s safe and recommended by experts!

While sprinting is also good exercise, it requires a lot of energy over a short amount of time. If not done properly or for too long, it may cause more stress on your body than an aerobic exercise, and in the worst cases lead to falls that can cause a traumatic brain injury – a risk factor that can lead to dementia.

Learn more about traumatic brain injuries and their risks to cognitive function.
7. True or false? Playing a game can help reduce your risk of dementia.
Sorry, try again!

Answer: A. True


Not all games are equally effective, but good brain-boosting games will have you pay attention, work with others, test your reaction time and more tasks that are both fun and a good workout for your brain! Examples of brain-challenging games can include chess, tabletop games, video games, word and number puzzles, jigsaws, crosswords, sudoku and memory games.

Check out these brain-boosting games on alzheimer.ca!
That's right!

Answer: A. True


Not all games are equally effective, but good brain-boosting games will have you pay attention, work with others, test your reaction time and more tasks that are both fun and a good workout for your brain!

Examples of brain-challenging games can include chess, tabletop games, video games, word and number puzzles, jigsaws, crosswords, sudoku and memory games.

Check out these brain-boosting games on alzheimer.ca!
8. What’s a good way to find out more about brain health?
Correct, but there's a better answer!

Answer: E. All of the above

Any of these choices are great options for more information and support to help you manage your brain health! Every person is unique, and your plan for brain health may. Both your doctor and the friendly staff at your local Alzheimer Society can suggest brain-healthy exercises that are right for you and your needs.

Get in touch with your local Alzheimer Society.
Absolutely right!

Answer: E. All of the above

Any of these choices are great options for more information and support to help you manage your brain health! Every person is unique, and your plan for brain health may. Both your doctor and the friendly staff at your local Alzheimer Society can suggest brain-healthy exercises that are right for you and your needs.

Get in touch with your local Alzheimer Society.

Check out these resources from RBC Wealth Management as well! 

Articles 

Recognizing the early signs of dementia. It can be hard to spot the early signs of dementia versus normal age-related memory loss. If dementia is diagnosed, there are steps caregivers can take to help support loved ones.

Promoting brain health at every age. Learn more about physical activity, nutrition and two lifestyle factors that may affect your brain health and risk of dementia.

Tip sheet

Memory problems: Age-related or a warning sign? Discover how memory loss can be a fairly common part of ageing, but may also present warning signs that require appropriate care.

Video

Dementia is not inevitable: Lifestyle tips for your brain health. Some of Canada’s leading scientists in women’s brain health discuss lifestyle choices that can help prevent brain-aging diseases.

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