Long distance caregiving

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Today, family members often live at some distance from each other. When a relative needs increasing support, caring from a distance presents additional and special problems.

Senior man looking aside.

A diagnosis of dementia affects the entire family. A living person with dementia needs more and more help as the disease progresses. Family members, at least at first, give much of the help required.

To give this help, they often have to take on new responsibilities, adapt to greater demands upon their time or alter the patterns of their own lives. These changes may be extremely stressful, both physically and emotionally.

Note: Since the relative needing help is often a parent, we will refer to the distant relative as "parent" and the caregiver as the "adult child." The information also holds true for others within the family who have different relationships.

Arranging help from a distance

Arranging for help from a distance requires planning. You may not be familiar with the services that your parent’s community has to offer. You may have little time during your visits to arrange for care and make sure it is delivered adequately.

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Société Alzheimer Society

Inviting someone to move in with you

People usually want to stay in their own homes and be independent for as long as they can. But when they become worried about a parent's well-being, many adult children ask, "Should we invite Mom/Dad* to move here?"

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Société Alzheimer Society

Long-term care

When a person living with dementia needs full time support, moving to a long-term care home may be the next step for you and your family.

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Smiling senior man at care home.

I'm caring for a person living with dementia

Understanding dementia and its progression is vital to ensure that both you and the person with dementia can live as well as possible. We have the resources to support you and your care of the person living with dementia.

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National ambassador Jane Kennedy